Happy World (Sea) Turtle Day!

Sea turtles are some of the most ancient animals in the world, having been around for over 100 million years. Unfortunately, due to natural and human pressures, they are now classified as either threatened or endangered. But why should we celebrate them? Sea turtles play a vital role in maintaining the health of our oceans.

Below are 7 interesting facts about sea turtles:

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Gray Whale Season in Baja was a Huge Success

Each year gray whales travel over 10,000 miles round trip between their nursery lagoons in Baja California Sur, Mexico, to their feeding grounds in the Arctic. This is one of the longest migrations of any mammal in the world.

During the 2016-2017 season, our partners at Mexico’s National Commission for Natural Protected Areas (CONANP) counted 1521 whales in the Vizcaino Biosphere Reserve, including 601 calves and 920 adult whales.  If you’re lucky, you might be able to see a few of them on their way back north to their summer homes in Alaska!.

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Help Save Our Valuable Wetlands!

Coastal lagoon, Cabo Pulmo National Park, Sea of Cortez (Gulf of California), Mexico, November

Wetlands are ecosystems that are partially or permanently flooded with fresh, saline or brackish water. They provide us with a number of important services such as sources for food and water security, as well as for adaptation and mitigation for the impacts of climate change.

Wetlands act as natural sponges, absorbing and storing excess water and thus reducing flooding caused by rain, storms, hurricanes, or tsunamis. During the dry season they release stored water, delaying the onset of droughts and reducing water shortages.


Its great economic importance is also due to its high productivity and biological diversity. Wetlands provide a refuge and nursery habitat to many marine species, especially migratory birds. [Read more…]

Mexican President Peña Nieto Establishes New 2.7 Million-Acre Baja Pacific Islands Reserve

Coronado Islands, offshore of the US-MEXICO border, Pacific Ocean, Baja California, Mexico

Coronado Islands, offshore of the US-MEXICO border, Pacific Ocean, Baja California, Mexico. Photo by Ralph Lee Hopkins

Ensenada, Mexico. December 5, 2016. The President of Mexico, Enrique Peña Nieto, today established the 2.7 million acre Islands of the Pacific Biosphere Reserve just offshore of the Pacific Coast of the Baja California Peninsula. This new federal reserve includes 21 islands that are often referred to as the “Galapagos of Mexico” and protects the marine areas around the islands that are habitat for marine mammals, seabirds, and commercially valuable species of fish and shellfish.

“The Islands of the Pacific Biosphere Reserve, that includes the Coronado and Todos Santos Islands off of Tijuana and Ensenada and just south of San Diego, provide habitat for a variety of species that do not exist in any other part of the world,” said Dr. Serge Dedina, Executive Director of WILDCOAST. “In total, this new reserve is home to 50 percent more endemic species of vertebrates and plants per unit of surface area than the Galápagos Islands.”

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Mining for Blue Carbon in the Mangroves of Baja’s Magdalena Bay

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Last week, a WILDCOAST team traveled to Puerto San Carlos in the community of Magdalena Bay. After three hours on the road surrounded by nothing other than cardon cacti, we arrived at our destination.  As you enter Puerto San Carlos, you are welcomed by a sea of mangroves that surround the community, and you are instantly wowed.

Magdalena Bay is the largest wetland in Baja California and provides habitat for some of most pristine and biologically important mangroves in the world. Research has shown that coastal desert mangroves store up to five times more carbon than tropical mangroves. 

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The San Diego Uptown Rotary Club Helps Conserve Oaxaca’s Coast

Last week, WILDCOAST staff and San Diego’s Uptown Rotary Club took a trip to Mexico’s beautiful coast of Oaxaca. Rotary members volunteered in activities to help conserve some of the world’s most important sea turtle nesting beaches.

The first day, volunteers and WILDCOAST staff members, Stephanie Batt, Tannia Frausto and Diane Castaneda traveled to the small village of Barra de la Cruz, 63 miles south of Huatulco.  Volunteers were introduced to the local communities that are part of the Chontal tribe that has inhabited the area for many generations. The Chontal community takes great pride in their land and works with WILDCOAST to conserve their important beaches and wetlands.  Barra de la Cruz is know for being home one of the most important sea turtle nesting beaches in the world. The Leatherback, Olive ridley and Green sea turtles go there every year to lay their eggs.

Volunteers helped create three bilingual (Spanish/English) signs that will help educate visitors and residents on how they can keep the area clean. Signs also educated people on the ecological importance of the area.

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2013 YEAR IN REVIEW

As the year comes to an end, WILDCOAST is proud to announce our accomplishments from 2013. We couldn’t have done it without those who support us in our conservation endeavors. Take a moment to look over our accomplishments from 2013, and please continue to support our work through 2014 by donating today: https://app.etapestry.com/hosted/WildCoast/OnlineDonation.html

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